Difference between revisions of "Kabir"

From Sahaja Yoga Encyclopedia
(Biography and bibliography)
 
(amended)
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==From [http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/sahajhist  Saints, Sufis and Yogis]==
 
 
 
Widely regarded as the greatest of the North Indian bhakti saints,  Kabir was a disciple of Ramanand. He was a weaver by trade. There are many references to Sahaja in his songs, eg.  
 
Widely regarded as the greatest of the North Indian bhakti saints,  Kabir was a disciple of Ramanand. He was a weaver by trade. There are many references to Sahaja in his songs, eg.  
  
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There was a great poet called Kabir in India and whatever he told was so much misunderstood by people that you can not imagine what interpretations they do. He said in one of his poetry ‘my beloved went away and I…` Now people think beloved means a lover; so he was saying about the death while people understood it is some sort of a beloved he is talking about. (2001-0425)
 
There was a great poet called Kabir in India and whatever he told was so much misunderstood by people that you can not imagine what interpretations they do. He said in one of his poetry ‘my beloved went away and I…` Now people think beloved means a lover; so he was saying about the death while people understood it is some sort of a beloved he is talking about. (2001-0425)
 
 
Bibliography:
 
''The Bijak of Kabir'', translated by Linda Hess and Shukdev Singh (San Francisco, 1983; Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, 1986);
 
''One hundred poems of Kabir'', translated by Rabindranath Tagore (Calcutta: Macmillan, 1970);
 
''Songs of Kabir from the Adi Granth'', translated by Nirmal Dass (Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1991);
 
John Stratton Hawley and Mark Juergensmeyer, ''Songs of the saints of India'' (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988), chapter 2'
 
Muhammad Hedayetullah, ''Kabir: the apostle of Hindu Muslim unity'' (Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass, 1977)
 
Linda Hess, ‘The cow is sucking at the calf’s teat: Kabir’s upside-down language’, ''History of Religions'' 22(4), 1983:313-337;
 
Saral Jhingran, ‘Spiritual experience, ethics and social vision of Kabir: a medieval bhakti saint of India’ ''Religious Studies and Theology'' 16(2), 1997:5-18;
 
Prabhakar Machwe, ''Kabir'' (New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi, 3rd ed.,1984);
 
Vijay Mishra, ‘Kabir and the bhakti tradition’ in ''Bhakti studies'', edited by G.M.Bailey and I.Kesarcodi-Watson (New Delhi: Sterling, 1992):82-235;
 
K.Schomer, ‘Kabir in the Guru Granth Sahib: an exploratory essay’ in ''Sikh studies'', edited by M.Juergensmeyer and N.G.Barrier (Berkeley: Graduate Theological Union, 1979):75-86;
 
Charlotte Vaudeville, ''A weaver named Kabir'' (Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1993);
 
Charlotte Vaudeville, ''Kabir. Volume I'' (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1974)
 

Revision as of 08:50, 23 August 2016

Widely regarded as the greatest of the North Indian bhakti saints, Kabir was a disciple of Ramanand. He was a weaver by trade. There are many references to Sahaja in his songs, eg.

Where there is neither sea nor rains, Nor sun nor shade; Where there is neither creation Nor dissolution; Where prevails neither life nor death, Nor pain nor pleasure; Beyond the states of Sunn and trance; Beyond words, O friend, Is that unique state of Sahaj.


Shri Mataji Nirmala Devi has spoken of Kabir many times, describing him as "a great, great Sahaja yogi" (2002-0724) who was "an outspoken fellow" (1978-0606) who fearlessly exposed the shortcomings of the society of his day (1985-1128).

Kabir was born to a weaver, they say they don’t think he was born to him but he was found by a weaver – whatever it is – and he belonged to Muslim family. But he realized that the Muslims as they are practising their Islam, is not going to give him what he wants. He has to seek his self. He has to know himself. So what did he do is to go on the bank of river Ganges in Benares and he stayed there waiting for a great realized soul called Ramanand. Swami Ramanand. When this Swami Ramanand came back after his bath, he immediately caught hold of his feet. After bath if somebody catches the feet of any Brahmin, he would shout at him. But he was a saint, he was not a brahmin. He said my son what do you want? He said: “Sir, give me initiation. I want self realization”. And Swami Ramanand immediately agreed. All the other people said: “Sir, he is a Muslim. He is an orphan brought up in a Muslim family, how can you give realization. He’ll not accept any of the principles which look like coming from Hindu religion.” Ramanand looked at Kabir, he could see a great seeker there. He said “You don’t know him, I know him”. And he took him with him and Kabira became a great saint after that. He is accepted by Hindus and Muslims, because he had that power of wisdom. He went to a man who was not belonging to his religion, who may have not accepted him, who might have just thrown him in the river. Also possible. But he knew also through his wisdom that this man is the one who will love me, because I am a seeker of Truth. (1993-0721)

Kabir Dasa has written all about Kundalini and everything. Like he says that when the Kundalini rises, it breaks the epitome of your physical being that is the brahmarandhra and you go into a complete nirvichara samadhi. Clearly he has said it, absolutely clearly. There cannot be more clear writings than Kabira’s. (1986-1009)

There was a great poet called Kabir in India and whatever he told was so much misunderstood by people that you can not imagine what interpretations they do. He said in one of his poetry ‘my beloved went away and I…` Now people think beloved means a lover; so he was saying about the death while people understood it is some sort of a beloved he is talking about. (2001-0425)